Bailli de Suffren Statue

Historic site and monument

Saint-Tropez
Suffren, who was a remarkable tactician and intrepid fighter, remains one of history's most important naval figures, alongside Nelson and Ruyter. He was, in fact, nicknamed "Admiral Satan" by the English. • Château de Saint-Cannat: 1729
• Paris: 1788

Son of the Marquis of Saint-Tropez, Pierre André de Suffren become a Chevalier de Minorité of the Order of Malta at the age of 8 and later Bailiff.

After fighting under Admiral d’Estaing during the American Revolutionary War, he was then given command of a five-ship squadron heading for the Indian Ocean. Arriving at his destination, he waged a fierce and relentless war against the English troops, winning five battles: Sadras, Provedien, Negapatam, Trincomalee and Cuddalore.

When he returned to Paris in 1784, Suffren was promoted to Lieutenant General of the French Navy, made a Knight of the Saint-Esprit and later became Vice-Admiral. Showered with honours, he died in Paris in 1788, after the King had given him command of an armed fleet at Brest. This violent, quick-tempered individual, a great bon viveur and obese hedonist, eventually died in a dual against the Duke of Mirepoix.

Suffren, who was a remarkable tactician and intrepid fighter, remains one of history's most important naval figures, alongside Nelson and Ruyter. He was, in fact, nicknamed "Admiral Satan" by the English.

Pierre-André de Suffren spent a large part of his childhood in Saint-Tropez where he discovered the sea and a love of sailing. Between military campaigns, he would come back to Saint-Tropez to unwind.
Prestations
  • French
Address
Statue du Bailli de Suffren
23 Quai Suffren
83990 Saint-Tropez
Opening

All year round, daily.

Nearby